Davis Projects for Peace

Undergraduate students at Georgetown design their own grassroots projects anywhere in the world to promote peace and address the root causes of conflict among parties. Applicants are encouraged to use their creativity to design projects that employ innovative techniques for engaging participants in ways that focus on conflict transformation, reconciliation, building understanding and breaking down barriers which cause conflict. The goal of the projects should focus on transforming conflict and sustaining peace.

Award: $10,000

Eligibility: First year, Sophomore, Junior, Senior

Individuals or up to 2 students can apply together as a group.

The Davis 100 Projects for Peace are made possible by Kathryn Wasserman Davis, an accomplished internationalist and philanthropist. Upon the occasion of her 100th birthday in February of 2007, Mrs. Davis, mother of Shelby M.C. Davis who funds the Davis UWC Scholars Program, chose to celebrate by committing $1 million for one hundred Projects for Peace. As a Davis United World College Scholars Program partner school, Georgetown University through CSJ awards one student or a team of students $10,000 to implement a grassroots project anywhere in the world which promotes peace and addresses the root causes of conflict among parties.

Interested applicants are strongly encouraged to read about the Davis Projects for Peace in order to understand the challenge that Kathryn Wasserman Davis envisioned when she created this initiative.

Questions about the process or the award application can be emailed to Amanda Munroe, Assistant Director of Social Justice Curriculum and Pedagogy at amanda.munroe@georgetown.edu csjglobalimmersion@georgetown.edu.

 

The Davis 100 Projects for Peace are made possible by Kathryn Wasserman Davis, an accomplished internationalist and philanthropist. Upon the occasion of her 100th birthday in February of 2007, Mrs. Davis, mother of Shelby M.C. Davis who funds the Davis UWC Scholars Program, chose to celebrate by committing $1 million for one hundred Projects for Peace. As a Davis United World College Scholars Program partner school, Georgetown University through CSJ awards one student or a team of students $10,000 to implement a grassroots project anywhere in the world which promotes peace and addresses the root causes of conflict among parties. Interested applicants are strongly encouraged to read about the Davis Projects for Peace in order to understand the challenge that Kathryn Wasserman Davis envisioned when she created this initiative. Questions about the process or the award application can be emailed to Amanda Munroe, Assistant Director of Social Justice Curriculum and Pedagogy at amanda.munroe@georgetown.edu csjglobalimmersion@georgetown.edu.

Your application should include the following pieces. When it is completed you may upload it through the Google qpplication form in a single PDF or Word document. Formatting instructions are included in a downloadable application template here.  

The template includes a:

Project cover letter

  • This should include the goals and plans for the project (who, what, where, how), expected outcomes of the project, and prospects for future impact or sustainability. It should also explain why YOU want to do THIS project.

Reference letter from partner organizations

  • The letter should detail how you and the partner organization were connected, why the project is relevant to their work on the ground, and what the host will contribute to the project - esp. how they will support you if you are traveling to work with them.

Budget

  • Each line item should include a short descriptive narrative to describe the expense and how you have estimated the cost. If the budget exceeds $10,000, you must include information about other funding resources that you will use to supplement the fellowship.
  • Example budget template

Answer the questions in the Google form and upload the application here.

Applications are due in fall semester 2018.

What does peace mean and look like?

“The word “peace” evokes complex, sometimes contradictory, interpretations and reactions. For some, peace means the absence of conflict. For others it means the end of violence or the formal cessation of hostilities; for still others, the return to resolving conflict by political means. Some define peace as the attainment of justice and social stability; for others it is economic well-being and basic freedom. Peacemaking can be a dynamic process of ending conflict through negotiation or mediation. Peace is often unstable, as sources of conflict are seldom completely resolved or eliminated. Since conflict is inherent in the human condition, the striving for peace is particularly strong in times of violent conflict. That said, a willingness to accommodate perpetrators of violence without resolving the sources of conflict—sometimes called “peace at any price”—may lead to greater conflict later.”

“Peace Terms A Glossary of Terms for Conflict Management and Peacebuilding,” United States Institute of Peace, Editor, Dan Snodderly, 2011.

Check out a glossary of more terms.

Additional resources we recommend you consult on conflict and peace are:

When should I start getting my materials together/ what does timeline look like?

Use the Fall semester to contact organizations, learn, conceptualize your project and work on the project proposal. The CSJ recommends requesting a letter from comm partner 2-3 weeks prior to turning in the application.  Before writing to the organization, have a general sense of what you want to do in relationship with that partner.

The CSJ is happy to answer any questions regarding connecting with peacebuilding organizations.

What do past organizations look like?

  • Community-based work should take place in/with a community-based organization (CBO). A CBO is defined as a: government agency, non-profit organization, non-governmental organization or school that has, in part, a social justice mission.
  • Community-based work should meet both the needs of the CBO and the learning outcome goals of the grant.
  • Community-based work should be in direct service, policy analysis, research, and/or advocacy work.
  • Community-based work should engage the student with individuals or communities of need and with issues related to social justice, community development and/or access to basic human needs and resources.

The organizations you choose to work with should be:

  • Locally directed and/or has strong ties to the local community
  • Demonstrable commitment to community where you will be working
  • A mission and vision statement related to peacebuilding
  • Able to host you and your project

Some examples are:

  • Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence
  • DC Peace Team
  • The Peres Center for Peace
  • Jesuit Refugee Service

How many students can apply?

It is recommended that 1 person per project proposal apply, however, a group of 2 or 3 students can apply per project proposal.